samoyed overgrown nail

How to Trim Samoyed Overgrown Nails Safely?

Trimming Samoyed overgrown nails safely

Samoyeds are one of the most intelligent and gentle dog breeds. Samoyeds must be groomed regularly, especially during the summer. One of the biggest tasks in grooming dogs is maintaining their nails paw perfect!

 

Keeping your dog’s paws in perfect condition is imperative to avoid any leg injury. Many proactive and highly energetic dogs get their nails naturally grind by constant digging and clawing. Samoyeds are also active and fun-loving, but their nails are strong and grow quickly. Thus, they require occasional trimming and cutting sessions.

 

Most dog parents are scared to cut their dog’s nails by themselves and instead get it done by either a vet or a trained dog groomer. It may sound peculiar to head to the vet for a simple nail-cutting task, but this is because dog nails have a quick in the center of their toenails. It is a collection of nerves and blood vessels that continues to grow as the nail grows. Moreover, some Samoyeds are ultra-sensitive and may not sit still while someone is handling their paws and nails. A healthy paw ensures your dog’s overall well-being, so here is a short guide on how to fix overgrown dog nails.

 

Is it painful for a Samoyed to have long nails?

While long nails are not painful for humans, it is different for our dog friends. Long nails can cause pain because of proactive nerve endings and the pressure put on the toe joint every time a Samoyed nail hits a hard surface. Moreover, long nails are at risk of getting curled and growing inward into the paw or sideways.

What do I do if Samoyed’s nail is growing in his paw?

An overgrown nail may grow into a dog’s paw pad. In such cases, it is not always necessary to take your dog to the vet for their nail grooming. You can fix an overgrown nail at home with some tips and tricks:

  • Separate the toes using your fingers while gently holding the paw
  • Use regular nail clippers and clip a tiny amount of the nail
  • After the nail is clipped you can slowly remove the remaining nail from the paw pad
  • If the nail is stuck in the paw, you can use small tweezers or pliers to pull it out
  • In case of some bleeding, you can use cornstarch or rinse the paw with warm water and pet-friendly antiseptic

When dealing with a Samoyed nail growing into pad, remember that the key is to make it a positive experience for your dog. Keep encouraging and praising them. Reward them with treats, so they feel secure and relaxed. Also, don’t shy away from seeking help from a groomer or a vet if you’re unsure or scared to do it yourself. It is better for both you and your Samoyed since you’ll be able to provide them emotional support, and the process is likely to go smooth in professional hands.

How do you cut Samoyed nails that are curled?

One of the safest ways to trim Samoyed nails that have curled is to use a scissors-type clipper recommended by most professionals. It is easier to get it under the nail without unnecessary movement. When it is placed correctly, slowly chip away at the nail with small bits at a time until the nail is no longer curled. You should stop clipping right away when you get close to the quick.

Problems an Overgrown Nail Might Cause

Long toenails can be a reason for discomfort and pain for your Samoyed. Since your fur friends love scratching themselves, they can get hurt seriously with long nails. samoyed long nailsOver time, overgrown dog nails can cause serious health concerns such as tendon injuries and deformed feet. Dog nails are worn off naturally while walking and running when the nails touch the ground. The longer the nail grows, the troublesome the Samoyed posture gets that result in the overuse of certain muscles and joints. It affects the bone structure of the Samoyed leg and can deform hind legs over time.

Long nails are more prone to split and break, and that may lead to a case of dog nail separated from the quick. If left unattended, nails can begin to grow into the paw and can cause the dog to limp. There is also a threat of dog paw infection since unwanted materials may stick inside the overgrown nail and come in contact with the blood vessels. Extremely overgrown dog nails may need surgery to remove the excess part without any complication.

How often to trim Samoyed nails?

Trimming Samoyed nails can prevent a lot of pain both in the short and long run. If the nails have grown too long, it may take over a month or two to bring them back in shape. An efficient and safe routine to trim your dog’s nail is doing it once a week until they are short enough for your Samoyed’s safety and comfort. Trim a very little part of a nail and repeat the process for some time. When you trim a part of the nail, the quick eventually dries and recedes that allows you to trim the nail even shorter. Once they are back to being short, you can continue to trim them once a week, so they don’t grow back longer.

 

Suppose your Samoyed gets anxious in the process. In that case, you can cut them once in two weeks instead of every week to ensure regular maintenance. If you are unable to maintain a cycle, simply remember that a dog’s nail should not be longer than the paw’s pad. Whenever you hear a clip-clop sound when your Sammy is around and see his nails exceed the pad, it is time for a pedicure!

What to do if I accidentally cut the quick?

Avoiding the quick while fixing overgrown dog nails is the tricky part, especially when dealing with extremely overgrown Samoyed nails. A whitish or grayish-pink colored matter, the quick is easier to find in light-colored nails while it is a complicated process in dark-colored nails. While it may get messy, a quick cut doesn’t hurt the dog beyond momentary pain. Remember that your dog’s life is not in danger because this will help you focus on them.

 

There might be bleeding, but do not panic. You can stop it using styptic powder or cornstarch. You need to stay calm, so your Samoyed doesn’t get anxious and scared. Praise him constantly during the whole process. Once the bleeding stops, avoid wiping the blood clot of the tip of the nail. If the bleeding doesn’t stop in a day or you see signs of paw infection, take your dog to the vet immediately.

Samoyed ingrown nail removal cost

Trimming your Samoyed toenails can be stressful, so many people prefer to get it done by professional groomers or the vet. Depending on your location, time, and budget, the cost of getting a Samoyed ingrown nail removed can vary. A vet may take something between $7 to $20 for the nail removal and clipping. Groomers may charge a similar price to clip and remove the ingrown nail however, they mostly offer a grooming package that may cost $20 to $40. Some larger packages may cost you more than $50.

 

Samoyed dogs are friendly pets, and it is our responsibility to make them feel as comfortable as we can. Take care of your furry friends and their nail care routine!

 

Related questions

1. How do I make nail trimming a comfortable experience for my Samoyed?

Start by touching and holding their paws on a regular basis to get used to the stimuli. Make them familiarize with the clipper and let them investigate it from top to bottom. Reward them with treats whenever they respond to the clipping tools. Having patience is crucial, so do not rush the process as it may make your Samoyed nervous and might cause a sudden movement. Sometimes, you might not be able to cut all their nails at once. It’s okay to give yourself and your dog time to relax, so take breaks.

 

2. What are some things to be careful of while trimming nails at home?

· Don’t squeeze your dog’s paws no matter what because that will be painful for them.

· Do not cut blindly. Always try to locate the quick before trimming. If you’re unable to find it, cut off very small nail part and check after every cut.

· While clipping the nail, never put the whole in the clipper. Follow the shape of the nail while cutting. You can cut at an angle or parallel to the nail but never at a direct crisscross.


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